John Grant Ross

/John Grant Ross

About John Grant Ross

John Grant Ross is the author of You Don't Know China and Formosan Odyssey.

Maritime Ryukyu, 1050-1650 • Gregory Smits

I’ve always taken Napoleon’s side when it comes to the Ryukyu Islands of Japan. No, his ambitions never extended that far east. I’m referring to an 1817 conversation Napoleon – then a captive on the lonely island of Saint Helena – had with British naval officer Captain Basil Hall. As […]

By |January 17th, 2020|Reviews|0 Comments

Three Tigers, One Mountain: A Journey Through the Bitter History and Current Conflicts of China, Korea, and Japan • Michael Booth

The Three Tigers, One Mountain title is a twist on an old Chinese saying that “two tigers cannot share the same mountain,” while the subtitle, A Journey Through the Bitter History and Current Conflicts of China, Korea, and Japan, gives an accurate description of the contents. This pairing of the poetic and the […]

By |January 11th, 2020|Reviews|0 Comments

Author Interview: Ray Hecht

Ray Hecht was born in Israel, raised in the American Midwest, and lived in China for many years. He now calls Taiwan home. He’s written seven books, including South China Morning Blues (published by Blacksmith Books and reviewed on Bookish Asia back in 2015). His latest work is Always Goodbye, an […]

By |December 14th, 2019|Author interviews|0 Comments

The Great Walk of China: Travels on Foot from Shanghai to Tibet • Graham Earnshaw

When it comes to travel writing, China’s immense size can be overwhelming. Solutions include focusing on a small town and its hinterland, or – at the other extreme – covering every province. A good compromise is taking a transect across the country, whether that thread be a river, a highway, […]

By |November 12th, 2019|Reviews, Uncategorised|0 Comments

The Front Lines of the War, and other poems • Scott Ezell

I don’t review poetry. Well, until now. I’m breaking that commandment in posting this review of Scott Ezell’s outstanding poetry chapbook, The Front Lines of the War. The problem with reviewing poetry is I lack the knowledge and ability to appreciate and describe it, and I’m not a big fan of […]

By |October 30th, 2019|Reviews, Southeast Asia, Uncategorised|0 Comments

Night in the American Village: Women in the Shadow of the U.S. Military Bases in Okinawa • Akemi Johnson

I’ve read nearly a hundred English-language works on the Ryukyus and Okinawa, and Night in the American Village is an easy pick for my top five books. It’s cleverly structured, well researched, informative yet highly readable, and, unusual for a book examining the issue of the American military presence on Okinawa, it […]

By |October 23rd, 2019|Reviews|0 Comments

Okinawa Moon • Arthur Oroz

This likeable novel opens on the island of Guam in the Marianas, where twenty-year-old Airman 2nd Class John Montez is stationed with the 19th Bomb Group, Far East Air Force.  He’s angry with himself for not joining the Marines like many of his friends and relatives have. A tough fighting unit with […]

By |October 21st, 2019|Reviews|0 Comments

Empire of Infields: Baseball in Taiwan and Cultural Identity, 1895-1968 • John J. Harney

With two excellent books on the history of baseball in Taiwan, is there need for another work on the subject? Not really, but Empire of Infields: Baseball in Taiwan and Cultural Identity, 1895-1968 is a welcome addition. Like its predecessors, it’s an academic publication where questions of national identity take precedence […]

By |October 20th, 2019|Reviews|0 Comments

Betwixt and Between: A Memoir of New China • Margaret Sun 

During a Publisher Interview last year with Graham Earnshaw, the man behind Earnshaw Books, I asked which era he thought was most underrepresented in English-language books on China. The 1950s he said without a moment’s hesitation, and I have to agree. Since that conversation, he’s been doing his bit to […]

By |October 18th, 2019|Reviews|0 Comments

Author Interview: Tom Carter

Talented American writer and photographer Tom Carter is one of the great characters of the expat tribe in China. I’ve always admired the way he throws himself into projects with the kind of tireless passion that makes the Energiser Bunny look lazy. When Carter did a photographic book on the […]

By |September 24th, 2019|Author interviews|0 Comments